A Touch of Elegance

English: A Montblanc 146 from ca. 1990 (top) a...

English: A Montblanc 146 from ca. 1990 (top) and a Montblanc 149 from 2009 (bottom) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is something downright sensual about holding a finely balanced fountain pen in your hand.  The stimulating and provocative flow of polished metal on paper, coupled with the deep translucent color of fresh wet ink as it flows from the tip, stimulates your creativity like no other instrument.  It’s the same feeling I get when I cut a delicate line with a newly sharpened gouge while wood carving.  The connective stimulation one feels when fingertips and instrument are one and the same.

I sit here, late aDSCF3010t night, hold my favorite Montblanc Meisterstuck 149 pen while writing this.  On my desk and up for sale is my most recent acquisition – a rare Montblanc Meisterstuck 146 that I just got received from  Montblanc after having it fully refurbished.  I want to draw ink into it so bad that I had to pull out my 149 just to get over the urge.  It is a beautifully balanced example of German artisanship.  The companion desk holder does justice to the quiet elegance of this pen.

So much is written about the Montblanc, that I could not add anything that could further enhance its reputation other than to say, everything they write about its quality and beauty, pales in comparison to actually holding and writing with one.  The final test of this pens quality – for me anyway – is the hardest part to imagine unless you are a writer who uses a pen.  I will do my best to convey it however.  I have to end this piece and put the pen down.  Unlike many other pens in my collection, a Montblanc become an extension of you that you will not want to quit.

DSCF3016If you are interested in this unique Montblanc 146, ca late 1970’s, you can see it in my pen & writing Instrument case at the American Classics Antique Mall – space B30, (Dads Corner of Mom & Me’s Vintage Linens & Lace,) or write me at GAClark@Write4Me.net and we can discuss details.

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Blurring The Lines: How Some Are Cashing In On The Self-Publishing Craze

This is good information that every author needs to know and well written. I hope you don’t mind that I reblog it.

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Copywriter VS Copyrighting

*Copywriting

*Copywriting (Photo credit: Bazstyle | Photography)

For most / many of you, the answer to the question of “what is the difference between the two words in the title” will be easy.  However, last week, I removed the words “Commercial Copywriting” from the sign on my car.  Apparently, it’s not as obvious as I thought.  I know – you are going to say you removed them because “Commercial Copywriting” might be redundant.  After all, “Commercial” refers to business and Copywriting is the act of writing copy (text) for the purpose of advertising or marketing a product, business, person, opinion or idea.   However, the question most asked of me is “I’ve written a book and I need to protect it.  Can you help me copyright it?”  The second most asked question was, “Do you write fiction?  I want to write a book on my life.  Can you help me write it?”  That was the reason for Commercial Copywriting.Yes – I write fiction.  I have two novels (print and e-book) on the market, (Show Low and Carrasco’s Gold) but that is not copywriting.  If I help you write your book, then I would be either your ghostwriter or a co-author.  If you want me to review and correct your book, then I would be your editor.  Then we get into the various degrees of editing.

If you want me to take your writing and correct, punch it up or fix it, then we are talking about copyediting.  Once again, we get into the level of copyediting you want done.  Do you need help making your book interesting?  Then copyediting turns into ghostwriter.  I have ghosted books, but don’t do it often.  No, I will not tell you who the clients were.  That disclosure would defeat the purpose wouldn’t it?

I write copy for companies, large and small, i.e. commercial copy.  I write brochures, web content, advertisements or other forms of writing that a business will use to sell their products or services.  I help my client sell or tell depending on their audience.  I also help them define their audience and hone their message so that it has the most impact.  I am for hire, as needed, therefore “freelance.”  I am part of your team, but not on your or anyone else’s payroll.

I help people communicate.  For a person, not a business owner, a résumé or biography is their personal sales tool.  That means that this person should use a commercial writer.  I use my commercial writing skills to write honest and accurate resumes and biographies.  Because of my background in business and sales, I help them properly define their job skills but I won’t create a skill where there was none.

How many of you have agonized over a presentation.  The task before you is to make your ideas logical and understandable for your audience.  I can help you do that.  However, I do not help people protect what they have written.  If you are afraid someone is going to steal your original ideas or work as an author, then you need an attorney who specializes in copyright law.

This week, I removed Commercial Copywriting from my vehicle, replacing it with Freelance Writer.  Yesterday – one day after the new sign was in place – I was asked, “What company do you work for?”

I can’t win.

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Steampunk Colorado – not a place, but a state of mind

My wife’s post.

Mom & Me - Vintage Linens, Lace & Antiques

Steampunk

I have to admit I didn’t know much about steampunk.  I probably still don’t know a lot about steampunk, even after my long conversation with two neat people who came into my store dressed in Victorian steampunk style.  I’m learning however.

However, I am always curious and open to new things.  Shrugging off my middle America farm girl cloak, I went looking for answers to my question “What is Steampunk?”  Thanks to Wikipedia I learned that Steampunk is a genre that originated during the 1980s and early 1990s and incorporates elements of science fictionfantasyalternate historyhorror, and speculative fiction.  It involves a setting where steam power is widely used—whether it be an alternate history such as Victorian era Britain or the “Wild West” era United States, Science fiction depicts Steampunk in a post-apocalyptic time —that incorporates elements of either science fiction or fantasy.

Now I understand it.  Turns out I…

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Pen Spinning, the Chinese and the Moon

Did you know that if it hadn’t of been for a ballpoint pen, our moon landing astronauts might not have returned from the moon? Did you know that the Japanese are tops in Pen Spinning? Did you know there was such a sport. Didn’t know that people spun pens? Neither did I, until I saw it. I decided to master this art, but after breaking a few glasses, sticking a pen in my eye and generally feeling quite inadequate for my age, I said the heck with it. Here, check it out http://youtu.be/mTIbc7WKoKs

The history of writing instruments is the history of civilization itself. Easily traceable, the history is evident in everything we see, hear or experience. Somewhere, sometime, someone had to write it. Our earliest known graffiti artists were cave men who left evidence of their thinking by scratching and painting their thoughts on cave walls. Then some genius determined that carrying a clay tablet around was easier than carrying a cave wall.

Necessity became the mother of writing paper when it was found that Papayas was lighter than clay, and that by pounding wood into pulp not only eliminated all your anger, but also made a lighter material called paper. Paper came about around 2000 BC. The problem with paper is that it required a pen and something called ‘ink.’ Some far thinking Chinese scholar had already invented the ink 600 years earlier in 2600 BC. They called it Indian Ink. (go figure) It was made from the oil from donkeys, musk ox , soot and lamp oil. It smelled nasty and the musk ox didn’t want to give up their oil to easy. (Have you ever tried to scrape oil off a musk ox?)

The problem with ink was that it was a liquid. Liquid held in suspense by bristles on a brush were ok, even though somewhat messy, but when you put this ink stuff on a pointed stick and tried to write with it, it didn’t get too far. Therefore, the Chinese used hollowed pieces of bamboo. They got farther in writing across a page, but still messy.  Someone thought of using the stem from marsh grass and we had ourselves the start of a communication. Next time, I’ll write and tell you about a sales rep and a lost million dollar sale, that led to the best known invention of modern times.

Fisher Space Pens

Fisher Space Pens (Photo credit: mr_t_77)

Oh, and that ballpoint pen and the astronauts. After returning to the landing module, Buzz Aldrin accidentally broke the switch used to activate the ascent engines. Without being able to toggle this switch, the rockets would not fire. NASA Engineers scrambled trying to figure out a solution. One of the astronauts took apart his new Fisher – write anywhere Space Pen and used the tube to shove down into the broken part of the switch.  Neat.   FYI, you can buy a vintage Fisher pen from my Antique Pen Store in American Classics – case 110 (Moved to a bigger Case #409 and we also expanded to Dads Corner – Space C30)

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Mickey Mouse Fountain Pens

The Mouse lives. Funny, I never thought of Micky Mouse as being a favorite collectable pen, but I can see where it could be. Great post.

Fountain Pen Restoration

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This week’s pen comes from a trade with a fellow collector. A while back, I wrote about a Popeye Pen (November 2010), another cartoon character that was popular in the early to mid 1900s.

Below, you can see the pen after I took it apart.  The pressure bar is still in good condition and usable, so I left it in the barrel.  As you can see, the sac had hardened and broke apart as I emptied and cleaned out the barrel.  The section and feed are in good shape, but you can see that most of the gold plate on the nib has faded away.

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Cleaning the exterior of these decorated pens is not as easy as a vintage Duofold, as one has to weave around the gold plated clips, levers, and artwork.  I was able to clean out most of the grime and scratches from the black plastic without…

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Book is done

It’s been a long time since I last posted, but I have had my reasons.  I reached my goal.  The book is complete.  The title is Book CoverCarrasco’s Gold and it is more historical fiction then contemporary fiction.  Actually, it’s closer to altered history, but you won’t find a category for that.   My editor say’s it’s the best of the Vince Roberts series and he’s not easy to please, so I’m encouraged.  You’ll find it available for download at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/edsson.  Pick up your advanced digital copy before I send it to full print.

Until next time.

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